Temporary Exhibitions

 

Subject to change

True Nordic: How Scandinavia Influenced Design in Canada

Ongoing: True Nordic: How Scandinavia Influenced Design in Canada at the New Brunswick Museum.
This landmark exhibition explores more than seven decades of Nordic aesthetic influence in Canadian design. True Nordic was produced by the Gardiner Museum and guest curators Rachel Gotlieb and Michael Prokopow. This exhibition examines the ways that modern Scandinavian design was introduced to Canada and how its aesthetic principles and material forms were adopted and adapted by Canadian artisans and designers. True Nordic presents a comprehensive, critical survey of Canadian furniture, ceramics, textiles, metalwork, and glassware. The objects in this exhibition range from the popular to the rarefied and demonstrate how Scandinavian design shaped craft and mass production in Canada after 1920.
Discover two significant New Brunswick connections in this exhibition. Erica and Kjeld Deichmann opened Dykelands Pottery (1935 – 1963) in Moss Glen, Kingston Peninsula. Erica developed and perfected thousands of glaze recipes, hand-modelled and painted “Goofus” figurines (a whimsical hybrid creature evoking parts of a horse, sheep, and giraffe) as well as mermaids that referenced Scandinavian folklore. Several films were produced on the Deichmann family pottery. Ernst and Alma Lorenzen opened the New Brunswick Pottery in Dieppe after the Second World War and operated it until 1949. The Lorenzens became known for their some two hundred hand-formed ceramic mushroom replicas, based on the sketches they made when they went foraging.  Mycologists collected them for scientific accuracy.
The Exhibition Catalogue “True Nordic How Scandinavia Influenced Design in Canada” by Black Dog publishing are available for purchase at the New Brunswick Museum Shop.

Erica Deichmann Gregg (Canadian, born in USA, 1913 – 2007), Kjeld Deichmann (Canadian, born in Denmark, 1900 – 1963), vase, 1962, stoneware with cobalt underglaze, overall: 33.8 x 34 x 34 cm. Purchased from the artist, 1967 (A67.83). New Brunswick Museum Collection.
Erica Deichmann Gregg (Canadian, born in USA, 1913 – 2007), Kjeld Deichmann (Canadian, born in Denmark, 1900 – 1963), decanter, 1948, stoneware, overall: 24 x 9.5 x 9.5 cm. Bequest of Lorna C. Pearce, 2012 (2012.29.4.1). New Brunswick Museum Collection.
Erica Deichmann Gregg (Canadian, born in USA, 1913 – 2007), Kjeld Deichmann (Canadian, born in Denmark, 1900 – 1963), bowl, 1950-1960, stoneware, overall: 17 x 19.6 x 19.6 cm. Bequest of Lorna C. Pearce, 2012 (2012.29.2). New Brunswick Museum Collection.

On a Silver Platter

Ongoing: On a Silver Platter exhibition at the New Brunswick Museum.
On a Silver Platter is a new exhibition of works by New Brunswick contemporary artist Mathieu Léger. Produced with the support of ArtsNB, the Sheila Hugh McKay Foundation, and the New Brunswick Museum, the exhibition, a product of Léger’s artist-in-residency at the New Brunswick Museum in 2012, is a project about history, culture and contemporary art in Canada. Equally serious and irreverent, this series of works by Léger seeks to engage a discussion about Canadian contemporary culture, while exploring ideas surrounding linguistics, assimilation, and history. The comments engraved on the silver plates inquire into current societal values, especially concerning the art world. The series examines themes of identity, cynicism, and sulking to look at humour in politics, cultural conflicts, and navel gazing art practices. The works have direct contact with spectators through humorous approaches within cultural and linguistic contexts.

EARTH - WATER - SKY

Until April 2, 2017: This exhibition features objects and works of art from Mi’kmaq, Passamaquoddy and Wolastoqiyik, people who have inhabited, since time immemorial, the region that includes present-day New Brunswick. It celebrates the ingenuity, skill and imagination required for living in, adapting to and connecting with our landscape: earth – water – sky.

Suzanne Hill: Singular

27 November, 2016 – 16 April, 2017:  Suzanne Hill: Singular exhibition at the New Brunswick Museum.
Produced by the New Brunswick Museum, the exhibition includes mixed media works and installations. Through the artwork, Hill presents a thought-provoking interpretation of the singularity of the life of human beings. Five installations, like the fingers on a single hand, express Suzanne Hill’s exploration of the idea of existing apart from others. “We are all islands” is the premise around which Suzanne Hill centres her most recent body of work, Singular. Rather than focus on the interconnection of all humanity, Hill proposes that each of us is defined as being clearly separate, the cumulative result of uniquely personal experiences as well as our particular actions and the decisions that we alone make. Thus while we may live in social situations and may interact, to lesser or great degrees with others, ultimately, we remain as parallel singularities delineated by the borders of our own perception and will.

Nurses Association of New Brunswick – 1916-2016 – One Hundred Years of Progress

Ongoing: Nurses Association of New Brunswick – 1916-2016 – One Hundred Years of Progress exhibition at the New Brunswick Museum.
The Nurses Association of New Brunswick marks its centennial this year. Discover the impact the Association has had on the profession in New Brunswick through this exhibition. Artifacts and photographs spanning one hundred years portray change and development in the nursing field, and the personal stories of those who worked in it.

The Franklin Exploration

On-going: Franklin Museum Network Pop-Up Exhibit – The Franklin Exploration at the New Brunswick Museum.
Led by Parks Canada and the Royal Ontario Museum, the Franklin Exploration Pop-up Exhibit highlights the story of the expedition as well as the discovery of HMS Erebus.  This three year national project will share the story of the Franklin Expedition and its discovery through displays, video and public programmes.
The Franklin Expedition has fascinated generations of Canadians. Last seen entering Baffin Bay in August 1845, the disappearance of the Franklin Expedition’s two ships HMS Erebus and HMS Terror remains one of Canada’s greatest mysteries 170 years later. 

 

 

 

Temporary Exhibition Dates subject to change.